Invited Presentations

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick

Jennifer Brown

Jennifer Brown

Jennifer Ferretti

Jennifer Ferretti

Charlotte Roh

Charlotte Roh

Creating an Open Vision for 21st-Century Libraries and Archives

Wednesday, April 14, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Central

Often when we think of “open access,” thoughts turn to resources (institutional repositories, educational resources). Kendrick invites attendees to consider applying a broader perspective of “open” through the concept of welcome in library and archival spaces. She’ll weave together the current landscape of higher education and her leadership and practice philosophies surrounding welcome, discuss the pathways and impacts of making contemporary libraries and archives feel welcoming to library workers as well as library users, and disclose some of the pitfalls and countermeasures that can happen along the way.

Kaetrena Davis-Kendrick

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick is Dean of Ida Jane Dacus Library and Louise Pettus Archives & Special Collections at Winthrop University (Rock Hill, S.C.). Kendrick earned her MSLS from the historic Clark Atlanta University School of Library and Information Studies and is an alumna of Winthrop University.

Kendrick’s research interests include professionalism, ethics, racial and ethnic diversity in the LIS field, and the role of communities of practice in practical academic librarianship. She is coeditor of The Small and Rural Academic Library: Leveraging Resources and Overcoming Limitations (ACRL 2016) and the author of two annotated bibliographies centering international students’ library experiences and the development of equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives in United States academic libraries. She is well-known for her benchmark studies and scholarly commentary on comparative international librarianship, student life experiences, communities of practice, minority librarian recruitment, and the impacts of advocacy, culture, systems, and organizational behavior and development on the well-being of library workers. In 2019, Kendrick was named the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Academic/Research Librarian of the Year. Learn more about Kaetrena’s mission and activities.

Systemic Oppression Requires Systemic Change: Recasting the Roles of Academic Libraries in Contemporary Contexts

Thursday, April 15, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Central

When recasting the roles of academic libraries in contemporary contexts, we must first confront several questions: who are the library workers we’ve forgotten, diminished, or silenced, and more importantly, how are we–the institutional, embodied ‘we’–shifting institutional practices to do right by them? How are we offering restitution that honors what they’ve suffered, while holding ourselves accountable, so that it never happens again? Do these questions sting like an indictment? They should. And we imagine collective responses might range from: ”we’re trying, [but],” to “we can’t, [yet].”

When institutions fail to address the needs of workers outside the library and information science status quo–white, cisgender women, able-bodied and often neurotypical–this labor falls on folks who identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) to rectify for ourselves. We build solidarity and capacity for community networks, and usually develop such solutions with little or minimal
institution support–or outside of institutions, altogether.

In this presentation, administrators from We Here, an organization created to provide safe and supportive community space for BIPOC in library and information science professions, will discuss the ways in which academic libraries have erected unnecessary boundaries that stifle BIPOC workers, cause inequitable pay gaps, neutralize progressive race-related legislation & policy, encourage toxic work environments, and more, all while repackaging and oversimplifying solutions to systemic oppressions that bedrock our field. We will explore what it means to center the needs and experiences of BIPOC workers, and will share examples of what we’ve done or seen within We Here and beyond. We invite you to dream radically with us.

We Here™️

Jennifer Brown (she/her) is a fiction writer and an Undergraduate Learning & Research Librarian at UC Berkeley who roots her praxis in antiracist pedagogies. Her published fiction has appeared in FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction, and her academic writings include book chapters and journal articles discussing performative diversity work, labor inequity in academic libraries, and more.

Jennifer Ferretti (she/her/hers) is an artist and Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art on the unceded land of the Susquehannock, Nentego (Nanticoke), and Piscataway peoples (Baltimore, Maryland). She is a first-generation American Latina/Mestiza whose librarianship is guided by critical praxis, not neutrality. With a firm belief that art is information, she is interested in the research methodologies of artists and non-Western forms of knowledge making and sharing. In 2016 she founded We Here, a supportive community for library and archive workers that identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color.

Charlotte Roh (she/her/hers) is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of San Francisco, where she works at the intersection of scholarly communication and social justice, particularly representation and diversity in the academic publishing ecosystem.